<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">one more doubt<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 2 December 2013 12:04, Stoppa, Igor <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:igor.stoppa@intel.com" target="_blank">igor.stoppa@intel.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small"></div><div class="gmail_extra"><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">


​Hi,​</div><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 2 December 2013 11:45, Łukasz Stelmach <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:l.stelmach@samsung.com" target="_blank">l.stelmach@samsung.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">


Please consider upgrading tens (hundreds) of thousands units. If you<br>
break them OTA you have to fix them OTA. You won't make N (where N ~<br>
1E5, you may be lucky enough to make 10% of you customers download<br>
flashing software for PC that still gives 90k) customers visit repair<br>
shops. You don't have that many repair shops to fix such failure (in<br>
reasonable time).<br></blockquote><div> <br><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">​I agree that, presented from this perspective there is a point to it.<br></div><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">


Questions: how likely is it?<br>Of course even if it's unlikely one doesn't want to be the responsible for the failure.<br>AFAIK nobody has yet managed to cause such massive failure on the field.<br></div><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">


</div><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">But let's assume that, since it's better to be safe than sorry, some mechanism has to be deployed,<br>


I'm still not sure that btrfs is the right answer. Not for btrfs per se, but rather because the rollback<br>would happen at a very low level which has no knowledge of what is really going on. ​</div><br><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">


There should be also some mechanism to re-align with the user data stored in the cloud,<br>which ​might have diverged significantly, in case the rollback happens significantly later on, after the upgrade.<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>

</font></span></div><span class="HOEnZb"></span><br></div></div></div></div></blockquote></div><br><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">What happens to apps that have been upgraded and are not compatible​ with the older<br>

</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">OS revision?<br clear="all"></div><br><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">

The new app might even have changed the config format.​</div><br>-- <br>cheers, igor
</div></div>